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US-backed Arms Blockade Risks Death of Millions of Yemeni Civilians


October 13, 2017
Selam Gebrekidan and Jonathan Saul / Reuters

A ship with 636 containers of steel, paper, medicine and other relief supplies bound for Yemen's suffering civilians, never arrived. Like dozens of other ships carrying humanitarian supplies, the ship was stopped by a Saudi Arabian warship deployed to enforce a US-backed arms embargo. Intended to block shipments to Houthi forces, it also blocks life-saving deliveries to a nation of 28 million people where a quarter of the population is starving and half a million children under the age of five are severely malnourished

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-yemen-saudi-blockade-specialreport/special-report-in-blocking-arms-to-yemen-saudi-arabia-squeezes-a-starving-population-idUSKBN1CG16C

In Blocking Arms to Yemen, Saudi Arabia
Squeezes a Starving Population

Selam Gebrekidan and Jonathan Saul / Reuters



The baby was born in war, even as planes blasted his village in Yemen. Five months later, Udai Faisal died from war: His skeletal body broke down under the ravages of malnutrition, his limbs like twigs, his cheeks sunken, his eyes dry. He vomited yellow fluid from his nose and mouth. Then he stopped breathing.
-- Daily Mail.


DJIBOUTI (October 11, 2017) -- Late last year, the Kota Nazar, a Singaporean ship with 636 containers of steel, paper, medicine and other goods, set sail to Hodeida, the largest cargo port in war-torn Yemen.

It never got there. Like dozens of other ships carrying food and supplies to Yemen over the past 30 months, the Kota Nazar was stopped by a Saudi Arabian warship blocking Yemen's ports on the Red Sea.

Saudi Arabia and its Arab allies have been stationing naval forces in and around Yemeni waters since 2015. Western governments approved the show of military force as a way to stop arms reaching Houthi fighters trying to overthrow Yemen's internationally recognized government.

The de facto blockade is exacting a dire humanitarian toll. The Saudi-led coalition's ships are preventing essential supplies from entering Yemen, even in cases where vessels are carrying no weapons, according to previously unreported port records, a confidential United Nations report and interviews with humanitarian agencies and shipping lines.

A UN system set up in May 2016 to ease delivery of commercial goods through the blockade has failed to ensure the Yemeni people get the supplies they need.

The result is the effective isolation of Yemen, a nation of 28 million people where a quarter of the population is starving, according to the United Nations. The war has claimed 10,000 lives. Half a million children under the age of five are severely malnourished, and at least 2,135 people, most of them children, have died of cholera in the past six months.

Aid agencies have ramped up their deliveries of food to some parts of Yemen this year. But Yemen imports more than 85 percent of its food and medicine, and commercial shipments have plunged. In the first eight months of this year, only 21 container ships sailed to Hodeida, according to port data compiled by the UN World Food Programme and Reuters.

By comparison, 54 container ships delivered twice the volume of goods in the same period last year. Before the war, 129 container ships reached the port in the first eight months of 2014.

Food and medicine are being choked off. No commercial shipment of pharmaceuticals has made its way to Hodeida since a Saudi-led airstrike destroyed the port's industrial cranes in August 2015, according to the administrator of the port, which is under Houthi control. In at least one case this year, a blocked commercial shipment contained humanitarian aid as well.

Representatives of the Houthi movement could not be reached for comment.



Hospital at breaking point as cholera outbreak hits Yemen. Patients lay in halls and under makeshift open-air wards at the al-Sabeen Hospital.RuptlyTV (May 5, 2017).

Abdallah Al-Mouallimi, the Saudi ambassador to the UN, denied last week that the coalition was blocking commercial shipments of food, medicine and fuel. Mouallimi said Yemen was receiving humanitarian aid.

"I can assure you that no shipment of humanitarian aid is being prevented from reaching Yemen by the coalition or for that matter by the Yemeni government. We have given clearance to all such requests for docking by any ship that carries humanitarian aid to the people of Yemen.

"We are the largest contributor of aid to the people of Yemen so it doesn't make sense for us to, on the one hand, be providing that aid and, on the other hand, be blocking it somewhere else."

In the cases of the Kota Nazar and 12 other ships examined in detail by Reuters, the Saudi-led blockade turned away or severely delayed vessels carrying aid and commercial goods before they reached Yemeni ports even though the United Nations had cleared the cargo and there were no arms aboard. Seven of those vessels were carrying medicine and food in addition to other supplies.

Aid shipments are caught in the net. One of the seven vessels was carrying antibiotics, surgical equipment and medication for cholera and malaria for 300,000 people. The shipment was held up for three months, during which $20,000 worth of medicine was damaged or expired, according to U.K.-based aid group Save the Children.

In July, four oil tankers carrying 71,000 tonnes of fuel, equivalent to 10 percent of Yemen's monthly fuel needs, were denied entry. Two were allowed in after five weeks, port records show.

In a report published last month, Human Rights Watch said that the Saudi-led coalition "arbitrarily diverted or delayed" seven fuel tankers headed to Houthi-controlled ports between May and September this year. In one case, a vessel was held in a Saudi port for more than five months, the group said.

Early this summer, Yemen's internationally recognized government notified the United Nations that it had closed a rebel-held oil port due to its "illegal status" and "damage to the marine environment."

The government is also diverting all vessels carrying cement and iron to the Yemeni port of Aden, which is under its control, according to the UN

As a result of the blockade, there have been no commercial flights to Sanaa, Yemen's capital, since last summer. And two of the world's biggest container shipping lines -- Swiss-based MSC and Singapore-based PIL -- stopped sailing to Houthi-held ports in early 2017, because of the delays and dangers involved. PIL has not yet resumed services.

n a confidential report submitted to the Security Council in April, UN investigators detailed many of the delays ships have faced getting through the blockade. In one case, a shipping company's vessels waited 396 days to dock at Hodeida, incurring $5.5 million in fuel and refrigeration costs.

The UN report also said that the coalition of Saudi Arabia and its allies takes an average of 10 days to grant vessels permission to dock at Hodeida even when the vessels are not delayed.

The United Nations Office for Project Services (UNOPS), which oversees the UN's clearance system, disputed the World Food Programme's and Reuters' count of container cargo delivered to Hodeida port.

In a statement to Reuters, UNOPS said its system, called the UN Verification and Inspection Mechanism for Yemen (UNVIM), has cleared vessels to deliver nearly 10 million tonnes of food, fuel and general cargo to Yemen over the past 16 months.

UNOPS did not provide evidence for the figure. It also did not specify how many of the ships it cleared were later stopped, delayed or rerouted by the Saudi-led coalition. UNOPS also said that events that transpire in international waters are beyond its remit.

"UNVIM has contributed to meeting the challenges of the current humanitarian crisis as much as possible by making basic commodities available in the Yemeni market," the UN said in a statement.

In at least two private correspondences with UN member states and aid agencies this year, UNVIM officials voiced frustration that the Saudi-led coalition stopped or delayed vessels they had cleared. One internal UNVIM report from March said the coalition had delayed six vessels, which were later granted access "after continuous liaison and effort."

The Saudi coalition isn't the sole reason for the plunge in imports to Yemen. Foreign banks have cut credit lines to businesses because of concerns about being repaid and difficulties with processing transactions. The Yemeni central bank's activities have been paralyzed over a tussle between the internationally recognized government and the Houthi fighters.

It is difficult to assess precisely the cumulative commercial and humanitarian effects of the blockade on Yemen. Many parts of the country are inaccessible to relief groups and reporters. Yet the UN has warned for more than two years that Yemen is a step away from famine.

The World Food Programme estimates that the number of people needing aid has risen to 20 million this year, or more than two-thirds of the population, compared with 17 million in 2016.

Yemen is starving because it is a battleground in a political struggle in the Middle East between Saudi Arabia and Iran. Saudi Arabia and its allies entered the war in Yemen to counter Houthi fighters, a Shi'ite group backed by Iran.

Western nations, at odds with Tehran over its nuclear program, supported the Saudi-led intervention by helping coordinate airstrikes and refueling Saudi warplanes. The UN Security Council effectively supported Riyadh by imposing an arms embargo on the Houthi fighters; it said Yemen-bound vessels could be inspected if there were "reasonable grounds" to suspect they were carrying arms.

Riyadh has never formally drawn a line beyond which ships are not allowed to sail. It has not published a list of goods and materials covered by its restrictions. But it says it has the right "to take all appropriate measures to counter the threats" from Iran-backed rebels. A senior official with Iran's foreign ministry denied allegations that his country provides financial and military support for Houthis in Yemen.

"Yemen is a catastrophic case. It is the man-made conflict that is driving hunger and driving the conditions for famine. Simple as that," said David Beasley, executive director of the World Food Programme. "If we end the war, we will end the starvation."

Some in the United States are beginning to criticize the blockade. Republican Senator Todd Young of Indiana, a member of the U.S. Senate's Committee on Foreign Relations, said Saudi Arabia might be violating humanitarian laws because it has impeded the flow of needed goods to Yemen.

"I do not suggest that the Saudis share all of the blame for this," he said, referring to the nine countries in the Saudi-led coalition. "But they share a significant portion of it."

EARLY WARNINGS
International aid groups grew concerned about the effects of the Saudi blockade in early 2015, shortly after the Saudi-led coalition, which includes the United Arab Emirates, Egypt, Bahrain, Kuwait, Jordan, Morocco, Sudan and Senegal, entered Yemen's civil war. Container shipments to Hodeida in 2015 fell to about 40 percent of their pre-war volume.

That summer, the UN issued the first of its many warnings that famine was possible in Yemen. Behind the scenes, the UN tried to convince Riyadh and its allies to let it inspect ships.

In early September 2015, the UN said it had reached a deal with the Yemeni government and the coalition to set up an inspection system that would facilitate the passage of goods to Yemen. The system, UNVIM, would be headquartered in Djibouti, the UN said. It took eight more months to secure the $8 million it needed to start operations.

When UNVIM was started in May 2016, its stated goal was "to restore trust among the shipping community" that there would be no unexpected and costly delays to shipments headed for Yemen.

Related
Yemen Cholera Cases Could Hit
One Million by Year-end -- Red Cross

Stephanie Nebehay / Reuters

GENEVA (September 29, 2017) -- The humanitarian situation in Yemen is a "catastrophe", and cholera cases could reach a million by the end of the year, the International Committee of the Red Cross said on Friday.

Warring parties in Yemen -- including the western-backed Saudi-led coalition -- are all using disproportionate force, leading to "very excessive" civilian casualties, said Alexandre Faite, the head of the Red Cross delegation in Yemen.

Posted in accordance with Title 17, Section 107, US Code, for noncommercial, educational purposes.

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