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Surveillance Valley: The Secret Military History of the Internet


July 9, 2018
Yasha Levine / Public Affairs Publishers & David Swanson / DavidSwanson.org

Tasha Levine's book, "Surveillance Valley," reveal that Google and other Internet firms have been major military and spy contractors from the beginning. Google partnered with Lockheed Martin on the Iraq war and remains a major partner of the military, the CIA, the NSA, etc. During the Obama years, the tech press and community aired no concerns whatsoever about this militarism, but that changed with the arrival of Trump. Levine maintains that Google employees do not object to militarism, just Trumpian militarism.

http://davidswanson.org/silicon-valley-will-not-save-you-from-the-surveillance-state/

Surveillance Valley:
The Secret Military History of the Internet

Yasha Levine / Public Affairs Publishers

The Internet is the most effective weapon
the government has ever built . . . .


(July 6, 2018) -- A reporter unearths the true history of the Internet: it was built by the government to spy on citizens, at home and abroad.

In Surveillance Valley, Yasha Levine traces the history of the Internet back to its beginnings as a Vietnam-era tool for spying on guerrilla fighters and antiwar protesters -- a military computer networking project that ultimately envisioned the creation of a global system of surveillance and prediction.

Levine shows how the same military objectives that drove the development of early Internet technology are still at the heart of Silicon Valley today. Spies, counterinsurgency campaigns, hippie entrepreneurs, privacy apps funded by the CIA. From the 1960s to the 2010s -- this revelatory and sweeping story will make you reconsider what you know about the most powerful, ubiquitous tool ever created.



Silicon Valley Will Not
Save You from the Surveillance State

David Swanson / DavidSwanson.org

(July 6, 2018) -- There was something quite odd about the very welcome news that some Google employees were objecting to a military contract, namely all the other Google military contracts. My sense of the oddness of this was heightened by reading Yasha Levine's new book, Surveillance Valley: The Secret Military History of the Internet.

I invited Levine on my radio show (it will air in the coming weeks) and asked him what he thought was motivating the revolt over at Google. Were they objecting to a particular kind of weapon, in the manner that some people rather bizarrely object to drones only if they are automated but not if a human pushes the murder button? Were they actually clueless about their own company?

Levine's answer requires investigation but certainly makes an interesting hypothesis. He said that all during the Obama years, the tech press and community aired no concerns whatsoever about militarism, whereas since the arrival of Trump such talk is to be heard and read. Levine maintains that Google employees do not object to militarism, they object to Trumpian militarism.

I had hoped for and wrongly predicted this phenomenon in the general public the moment Trump gained the throne. Is it possible that it's finally begun, but begun in Silicon Valley?

Levine's book describes Google and other Internet corporations as major military and spy contractors from the beginning. Google partnered with Lockheed Martin on parts of the war on Iraq and is a major partner of the military, the CIA, the NSA, etc. Surveillance Valley goes back to the post-WWII origins of today's military madness.

Military experiments as preparation for war, "field tested" in Vietnam, and supported by President Kennedy as appropriately hi-tech and modern, were actually war and developed into one of the worst wars ever seen. Vietnam was mass-surveilled -- or the attempt was made and foiled with bags of urine and other low-tech tricks.

Tools developed in Vietnam were immediately applied against US citizens, especially those trying to improve the United States in any way. And the overabundance of data drove the development of computers that could handle it. Spying on everyone is not an enterprise tacked onto the computerized world; it's why we have a computerized world.

Arpanet is not a secretive predecessor of the Internet that was used by the military and became known after the Internet mushroomed. It's a project that was publicly reported on as a major mass surveillance threat in 1975. The connecting of computers with each other was feared as a tool of tyranny. Congressional hearings were held.

By the 1990s computer wizardry, which had been seen as an arm of a threatening military-police state was romanticized as rebellious "hacking," an image transformation the enormity of which has been overlooked because we're in it.

Nowadays the supposed inability of certain computers to be hooked up together is used as an excuse for keeping refugee kids separated from their families, and our immediate reaction is to say: Well hook those computers together, already!

The Internet was not just developed in large part by the military, but also privately for the military. It was privatized without much public debate, an enormous giveaway to which the destruction of net-neutrality is just a final scene.

The search and advertising interests of companies like Google have long overlapped almost exactly the surveillance interests of the US government, while so contradicting the public image desired by Google that Google has kept its basic functions tightly secret.

That changed in a way when Edward Snowden revealed that all our favorite Internet companies were working with the NSA on its PRISM program to spy on us. But, as Levine recounts and objects to, Snowden chose for his libertarian ideological reasons not to support any legal regulation of these "private," contracted companies. He chose to blame only the government and to in fact promote private companies as the answer, technology as the ultimate solution.

But Levine shows that Tor and Signal and other companies that Snowden and many others promote as a means to protect your privacy from the government (as well as to hide all kinds of immoral and criminal enterprises) have themselves been US military projects from the start, are themselves US military contractors, and also do not work -- at least not remotely to the extent that people tend to imagine. I'll leave debating the details of Tor to those capable of and interested in such matters, but will simply note a few obvious points.

First, nonviolent activist organizing succeeds when it is open and public and grows large. Secrecy has always been a danger to organizing, and technology doesn't change that.

Second, there has never been an arms or technology race in which one side achieved permanent eternal victory, and it makes no sense for well-intentioned whistleblowers and journalists to imagine they've achieved such a thing.

Third, even lacking such magical technological weapons (or what Levine calls the NRA solution to social problems: everybody get a good gun) we do have other tools at our disposal, including honesty, courage, factual and moral persuasion, community, inspiring models of caring and success, and of course the open Internet to any extent that it remains open.

David Swanson is an author, activist, journalist, and radio host. He is director of WorldBeyondWar.org and campaign coordinator for RootsAction.org. Swanson's books include War Is A Lie. He blogs at DavidSwanson.org and WarIsACrime.org. He hosts Talk Nation Radio. He is a 2015, 2016, 2017 Nobel Peace Prize Nominee.

Posted in accordance with Title 17, Section 107, for noncommercial, educational purposes.

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